Garden living, Design & Landscaping

17 Out of The Ordinary Upcycled Garden Planters

Instead of throwing away your old “junk”, why not repurpose those items and turn them into real garden treasure?

We have a chance to look after the environment whilst putting our own mark on our gardens using everyday items we no longer need, and ‘Upcycling’ them into unique garden planters. Below are a few ideas to get your creative side flowing!

Kids pants filled with earth can hide ugly pots and look adorable. Tie off the legs and tuck into boots or shoes or stand them in the earth by filling with concrete instead as a sturdy base.

Plumbing pipes have lots of uses but they’re great for light succulents. Spray them any color you want and make sure you weight the bottoms down or screw them onto something or they may tip.

Old boots are rustic and will weather well. They’re the perfect cover for hiding small planters and are easy to hang on walls or sit on a bracket. The best thing is that the grottier the boot the better it looks as a planter.

Milk jugs are easy to cut and have a convenient handle to hang from. These are a great size for kitchen garden herbs which won’t get too big and the plastic is easy to write on for names.

Rotten trees often are hollow inside so the wood is no good for woodcraft. By stuffing moss inside these make the perfect home for orchids or succulents which won’t require a lot of water, so the wood won’t rot further. These have a nice natural feel.

Old tires are very easy to source, and when you pop them inside-out you won’t see the wear and tear. By cutting them up into a design you’ll end up making a pretty flower shape that is strong and sturdy and big enough to hold a variety of plants, even a small tree.

If you don’t have an old canoe they’re fairly easy to shape from fallen limbs. A wooden canoe is a perfect home for flowers because it’s shallow and long. An ideal focal point and unique planter.

Wine bottles are versatile and easy to cut. By leaving the base intact you create a perfect small pot and the shape makes it ideal for hanging.

A great way to reuse and keep sentimental toys. These can be packed with small plants and after sturdy enough to hold the weight of dirt. Ideal for trucks and construction toys these look good for an auto enthusiasts garden as well.

Kids bikes are perfect for screwing on planters and baskets. They’re sturdy and when properly painted will last well outside.

Take the bike a step further with a whole car! This is perfect for a car enthusiast or someone who just can’t bear to part with a sentimental vehicle but still gives it a second, prettier life instead of a clunker eye-sore.

Everyone loves to hate crocs but they make ideal hanging planters because the holes allow drainage. They come in a variety of colors perfect to match any plants.

Books are a creative, but short-lived planter. Paper degrades quickly so these are best for indoors. Line the cut with plastic and place a small pot inside to protect and prolong it. Perfect for small accent plants.

Just like the work boot, a welly is perfect for the garden because it’s waterproof! Drill drainage holes so your plants don’t rot and either mount or sit these with small plants inside. Ideal for a 2 tier look with one in the top and another a the bottom.

Tea tins are the ideal herb garden for the kitchen windowsill. They’re small and just the right size. Be sure to put a mat/tray underneath as the rust from the bottom will stain.

Lightbulbs make beautiful hanging planters or vases which look like suspended raindrops. The work is very delicate to do and you’ll want to retain the screw base so there’s something to hang with. Not for the clumsy!

Old muffin tins make the perfect small planter. These are ideal for rounded plants like peppermint and succulents as they will look like green cupcakes!Many old pans are quite pretty patterned and very decorative.

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